© 2017 Justin Kauffman

When I met Ina, she told me that when her husband had died, he left a large slab of Walnut in his workshop.  He had always wanted to make a table out of it but could never figure out what kind of legs to put the slab on.  Ina asked if I could make this slab into a table.  After consulting with one another, she decided that she liked a Nakashima style base.  I suggested the addition of wedges with a curve on them to tie the curves of the top into the base-a suggestion that she liked.  The base, composed of straight lines but several different angles, is meant to look more than adequate in strength to carry the mass of the top. Once I got the slab into my shop, the first order of business was flattening it.  I eyeballed the slab to level and built a plywood box and a jig to allow my router and straight bit to ride along the box and rout the top flat. After years of becoming pale in the sun, we were pleasantly surprised to see that the slab had incredible grain under the old finish and faded color. I turned the slab over and cut two parallel grooves to accept the cleats of the base.  I drew the base full size so that I could work out the angles.  The joinery is all angled mortise and tenon with a few compound angle shoulders for extra fun.